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Recipes

Kosher Coconut Custard Danish

This Kosher Coconut Custard Danish is derivated from a Recipe for a Babka. You can buy those Coconut Custard Danish straight from Pariser Bakery.

A Danish, like our Coconut Custard Danish, is a multilayered, laminated sweet pastry in the viennoiserie tradition. The concept was brought to Denmark by Austrian bakers and has since developed into a Danish specialty. Like other viennoiserie pastries, such as croissants, it is a variant of puff pastry made of laminated yeast-leavened dough that creates a layered texture.

Ingredients send grocery list
  • Babka dough
  • 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • large eggs
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2/3 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • Egg wash (1 egg + 1 teaspoon of water)
  • Coconut custard
  • egg yolks
  • 6 teaspoons butter, softened
  • 6 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cups shredded unsweetened coconut
Directions
  1. For the dough: In a mixer bowl, combine flour, sugar, salt, yeast, eggs, and water. With a dough hook, turn the mixer on low speed until it starts coming together. Pick up a little more speed and add a little water if necessary (2 to 3 tablespoons). It will look a little dry, but that’s okay.
  2. Add butter 1 tablespoon at a time with the mixer on low speed, waiting for it to be incorporated into the dough before adding the next. Mix on low-medium for at least 5 minutes before you see the dough pulling from the side and becoming smooth.
  3. Mix and scrape down the bowl for another 5 minutes. Place rounded dough in an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and stick it in the fridge to rise overnight.
  4. For the filling: Cream butter and sugar and mix in egg yolks. Then stir in coconut.
  5. Grease 2 loaf pans and line with parchment paper. Work with half of the dough from the fridge. Roll out on a floured counter into a 15-x-10-inch rectangle.
  6. Spoon half of the filling evenly over top, leaving a clean 1-inch border around the edges. Start by rolling the shortest side of the dough into a tight log. Using a sharp knife, cut the log in half lengthwise into two arms, leaving 1 inch of the end (where the arms meet) uncut.
  7. Braid the two arms by carefully crisscrossing the strands over each other. Repeat until the end of the log, press together to seal, and tuck the ends under. Swiftly transfer dough to the greased loaf tin. Repeat with other half of dough.
  8. Cover with a damp tea towel and leave to rise for 1 hour. Heat oven to 375° F and place loaf on the middle rack of your oven. Make the egg wash and brush over the top. Bake for 30 to 40 mins. Cover the top with foil if it browns too quickly. Cool for 10 minutes in the pan, then loosen around the edges with a knife and carefully invert onto a cooling rack. Wait until cool before slicing into.
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Recipes

Kosher Boston Cream Sufganiyot

Sufganiyot (Israeli Donuts)

A Kosher Boston Cream as Sufganiyot for Hannukah is a cross between a beignet and a Custard donut, sufganiyot are pillowy donuts that are eaten in Israel and around the world during Hanukah. (By Jennifer Segal)

Servings: 24 Prep

Time: 30 Minutes

Cook Time: 15 Minutes

Total Time: 45 Minutes, plus 1 to 2 hours for the dough to rise

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup warm water, heated to about 110°F (see note)
  • 1 tablespoon instant/rapid-rise or active dry yeast (note that this is more than 1 packet)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, plus more for coating
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus about 2 quarts more for frying
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • About 1 cup custard or dulce de leche

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Combine the water and yeast in a small bowl and let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the flour, confectioners’ sugar, salt, and nutmeg. Whisk to combine and set aside.
  3. Add the egg yolks, 2 tablespoons of oil, and vanilla to the water/yeast mixture and whisk with a fork until combined.
  4. Add the liquid mixture to the flour mixture and stir with rubber spatula until the dough comes together. It should be a bit sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap (no need to clean it first) and let the dough rise on the countertop until doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.
  5. Line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towels. Line another baking sheet with ­parchment paper and dust heavily with flour. Generously dust a clean countertop and your hands with flour. Scrape the dough out of the bowl onto the counter and dust the dough with flour. Pat the dough into 1/4-in-thick rectangle (it should be about 10 x 12-inches in size), making sure the bottom doesn’t stick and adding more flour to the counter and your hands as needed. Using a pizza wheel or very sharp knife, cut the dough into 24 two-inch squares and transfer to the floured baking sheet, leaving a little space between the squares. Sprinkle the squares lightly with flour.
  6. Add enough of oil to a large Dutch oven or heavy pot to measure about 2 inches deep and heat over medium heat to 350°F. (If you don’t have a candy/deep-fry thermometer, drop a 1-in cube of bread in the oil; if it takes about 1 minute to get golden brown, the oil is at the right temperature.) Place 6 dough pieces in the oil and fry until golden brown, about 3 minutes, flipping halfway through frying. Adjust the heat, if necessary, to maintain the oil temperature between 325°F and 350°F. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the donuts to the paper towel-lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining donuts.
  7. When the donuts are cool enough to handle, use a paring knife to puncture the side of each to form a pocket in the center. Place the tip of a squeeze bottle or piping bag into the pocket and squeeze 1 to 2 teaspoons of custard inside. (Alternatively, if you don’t have the right tools or just don’t want to bother, serve the filling on the side.)
  8. Using a fine sieve, dust the donuts generously with confectioners’ sugar. Serve warm.
  9. Note: Warm water helps activate the yeast. The temperature doesn’t need to be exact so no need to use a thermometer; just try to get it about the temperature of bath water. (If you place your hand under the stream of water in the faucet, it should feel hot but you should be able to leave your hand there without it stinging.)
Categories
Recipes

Sufganiyot for Hannukah

Sufganiyot (Israeli Donuts)

A Sufganiyot for Hannukah is a cross between a beignet and a jelly donut, sufganiyot are pillowy donuts that are eaten in Israel and around the world during Hanukah. (By Jennifer Segal)

Servings: 24 Prep

Time: 30 Minutes

Cook Time: 15 Minutes

Total Time: 45 Minutes, plus 1 to 2 hours for the dough to rise

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup warm water, heated to about 110°F (see note)
  • 1 tablespoon instant/rapid-rise or active dry yeast (note that this is more than 1 packet)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour, spooned into measuring cup and leveled-off
  • 1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, plus more for coating
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus about 2 quarts more for frying
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • About 1 cup jam or jelly (or custard, Nutella, pudding, pumpkin butter, apple butter, dulce de leche, etc.), optional

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Combine the water and yeast in a small bowl and let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the flour, confectioners’ sugar, salt, and nutmeg. Whisk to combine and set aside.
  3. Add the egg yolks, 2 tablespoons of oil, and vanilla to the water/yeast mixture and whisk with a fork until combined.
  4. Add the liquid mixture to the flour mixture and stir with rubber spatula until the dough comes together. It should be a bit sticky. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap (no need to clean it first) and let the dough rise on the countertop until doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.
  5. Line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towels. Line another baking sheet with ­parchment paper and dust heavily with flour. Generously dust a clean countertop and your hands with flour. Scrape the dough out of the bowl onto the counter and dust the dough with flour. Pat the dough into 1/4-in-thick rectangle (it should be about 10 x 12-inches in size), making sure the bottom doesn’t stick and adding more flour to the counter and your hands as needed. Using a pizza wheel or very sharp knife, cut the dough into 24 two-inch squares and transfer to the floured baking sheet, leaving a little space between the squares. Sprinkle the squares lightly with flour.
  6. Add enough of oil to a large Dutch oven or heavy pot to measure about 2 inches deep and heat over medium heat to 350°F. (If you don’t have a candy/deep-fry thermometer, drop a 1-in cube of bread in the oil; if it takes about 1 minute to get golden brown, the oil is at the right temperature.) Place 6 dough pieces in the oil and fry until golden brown, about 3 minutes, flipping halfway through frying. Adjust the heat, if necessary, to maintain the oil temperature between 325°F and 350°F. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the donuts to the paper towel-lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining donuts.
  7. When the donuts are cool enough to handle, use a paring knife to puncture the side of each to form a pocket in the center. Place the tip of a squeeze bottle or piping bag into the pocket and squeeze 1 to 2 teaspoons of jam or jelly inside. (Alternatively, if you don’t have the right tools or just don’t want to bother, serve the filling on the side.)
  8. Using a fine sieve, dust the donuts generously with confectioners’ sugar. Serve warm.
  9. Note: Warm water helps activate the yeast. The temperature doesn’t need to be exact so no need to use a thermometer; just try to get it about the temperature of bath water. (If you place your hand under the stream of water in the faucet, it should feel hot but you should be able to leave your hand there without it stinging.)
Categories
Recipes

The Art Of Blintzes Baking

Eliezer Secret Blintzes Recipe

In the old neighborhood there was a guy named Eliezer, he was not a great cook but every now and again he used to make his blintzes and all the kids in the neighborhood couldn’t resist the smell so we used to ask him for some, this created a tradition in which he would make blintzes and open his doors to anyone who wanted a taste.

When I started baking and making food I asked old Eliezer if he could help me make some blintzes, he refused to give me his own recipe, but insisted on having me for dinner. When I came over I was surprised to find that he had not cooked a thing, he told me that I would make blintzes for him that evening, and from that evening, making blintzes for Eliezer and listening to what he had to say about them (“Oh! This one is way too fat, it feels like bread!”, “Yes! Now I can feel the air in the blintzes, I think you are getting it”) this recipe was born, it is not Eliezer’s original recipe, but I think its close enough.

To make Blintzes you will need
500 ml1  milk
50 gram of sugar or artificial sweetener
3 fresh eggs
A Pinch of salt

Mix all of the ingredients using a blender for about two minutes until the mixture becomes smooth and consistent. Pore the mixture in a spiral movement too a pre heated pen that is lightly oiled until you have a fine thin layer.

After a minute on that fire the side of the blintzes is ready and now you should get ready flip it too the other side for an additional minute or so.

Now comes the good part, blintzes work great with both savory and sweet additions, so you can try and create whatever combination you like, here are some suggestions – garnish with nuts Fresh cinnamon. Fresh vanilla. Raisins. Figs. Apricot. Or drayed nuts.

For the classic Jewish blintzes recipe (blintzes are not exclusively Jewish food, many nations eat them in many forms and names, and it is definitely not the invention of the Jewish kitchen), take 250 gram of soft cheese. 150 gram of  comfiture. Mix, and that’s your traditional Jewish blintzes

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Recipes

The Honey Cake

This time of year always marks the beginning of a very busy month for the Jewish community, there are a few major holidays that take part in a relatively short time with only a few days separating one holiday from the other.

The real excitement is usually over the Jewish new year, which is usually celebrated on September, and which is the first major holiday after Passover which takes place in April, so this is one holiday that gets all the attention. The preparation for “rosh hashana” the new year is, as always, filled with food buying and preparation of many traditional dishes, many of whom represent different things to different communities around the world, the new years feast can be very different from one place to the other.

One special feature of this holiday is the traditional honey cake that is eating in the end of the dinner and is served to guests as well as the family members at every occasion in this month, the honey cake is not only healthy and tasty, it is also a wish for a sweet new year that will come and used to welcome the beginning of the year.

The interesting thing about this traditional cake is that there are a lot of different variations of it, it is one of the most popular dishes that people like to personalize and make a change in, in contrary to many other traditional recipes that are never changed, the basic of this cake and the relative easiness of preparation allows many to try and add something and experiment with the flavors, something that creates a lot of different cakes and a multitude of recipes.

The things you will need to take into account when planning to make a honey cake is that you should use high quality products, the fact that it is not a complicated cake does not make it a cheap one, if you use quality products it will be felt when eaten and the compliments will start knocking on your doors, poor quality honey will not produce the same effect probably because it will not stand the heat of the baking process so well and will effect the cakes takes and texture.

Remember that the best time to make and eat this cake is the end of the summer, even if you are not Jewish it is always nice to think that this cake and the preparation needed in making it encompasses in it a wish for a sweet and good new year, a successful and happy beginning of yet another year.
 
Let me say one more thing, as many bakers around the world recommend, try and bring the feeling of happiness into the making of the cake, although it can not be tested or quantified a happy baker usually makes great cakes, and the means of doing that are as diverse as the cakes themselves, so sing, dance or just think happy thoughts, and may you have a happy new year, all the year.

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Recipes

Kosher Sweet Challa

This is a killer Kosher Challa recipe, use it to make your family and friends happy on the evening of Friday.

The ingredients –
2.1 Lb Flour
1 ½ Oz Sugar
1 Tsp Salt
250 Mil Cold Water
1 Oz Margarine

Use all the ingredients in a mixer, mix all well until the dough is consistent, to do that you can use a mixer normal speed or slow for about 4 minute and than move to fast for about 5 minutes.

Take out the mixture from the mixer and let rest for about 20 minutes on the side covered with a wet cloth of any kind.

Cut the dough into sex equal parts and roll them into long thick strings, then you will have to weave them into each other to form the shape of the Challa.

Once you have two Challa bread let them aside until they doubled in size, beat two eggs and cover all the Challa with them, let dry and place in a pre heated oven (180c or 360f) for about half an hour.

You can add nuts or raisins if you wish.
Good luck, enjoy your baking and good eating!